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Proliferation
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Euploidy
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Aneuploidy
Duesbergs/Rasnick Hypothesis
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You are here Background | Duesbergs/Rasnick Hypothesis
   

Chromosomal vs. mutation theory of carcinogenesis

 
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Aneuploidy and cancer are not heritable, mutations are
 
Cancer is caused by tumour specific chromosomal aneuploidies
 
Evolution of spontaneous cancer specific karyotype is extremely time-consuming (20–30 years), mutations occur much faster
 
Carcinogenes act as aneuploidogenes but many are not mutagenic
 
Non-mutagenic carcinogenes induce aneuploidy by impairing regular
chromosomal segregation during mitosis
 
Cancer-specific karyotypes generate cancer specific phenotypes
 
Aneuploidy induces phenotypic alterations by katalysing karyotypic alterations
 
Evolving chromosomal chaos during carcinogenesis
 
Karyotypes of cancer cells may change with cell divisons
 
3 % of tumour cells in culture (HT29 cell line) change their chromosomal set
 
Ability for rapid and permanent changes of karyotype results in spontaneous increase
of grades of malignancy over time (=tumour progression)
 
Low-grade gastrointestinal stromal tumour with low-degree chromosomal aneuploidy High-grade gastrointestinal stromal tumour with high-degree chromosomal aneuploidy  
 
 
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A theory of carcino-genesis should be consistent with known facts about cancer

 





 
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Chromosomal instability itself causes increasing aneuploidy