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Proliferation
Cell Cycle
Mutations
Euploidy
Polyploidy
Aneuploidy
Duesbergs/Rasnick Hypothesis
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You are here Background | Duesbergs/Rasnick Hypothesis
   

Chromosomal sets of cancer cells are unstable

 
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Cancer cells are able to develop variant karyo- and phenotypes during
cell divisions
 
They thus lose their social responsability and continuously grow on costs
of healthy cells
 
Using their ability for rapid chromosomal change, cancer cells may progress
spontaneously from low to high malignant behaviour
 
Schemative illustration of increasing chromosomal chaos during carcionogenesis
From Scientific American, May 2007
 
Chromosomal- or mutation-theory of carcinogenesis?
 
Two genetic theories currently compete:
 
The chromosomal-theory claims that cancer develops due to specific karyotypic aberrations
 
The mutation-theory claims that cancer is caused by several specific mutations
 
 Chromosomal aneuploidy is said to be a consequence of cancer-causing mutations
 
 
 
 
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Increasing chromosomal chaos causes increased a grade of malignancy